CoTradeCo ratings, classes, types, and standards
Overview of ratings and regulations

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Helmet types and classes

Protective helmets are classified according to the specific impact and electrical performance requirements they are designed to meet. All protective helmets in accordance with this standard shall meet either Type I or Type II impact requirements. In addition, all helmets are further classified as meeting Class G, Glass E, or Class C electrical requirements.

OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) guidelines for head protection are referenced in 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.135 and 1926.100.

Occupational Head Protection

29 CFR 1910.135(a)(1) states, “Each affected employee shall wear protective helmets when working in areas where there is a potential for injury to the head from falling objects.” The standard also covers conditions where electrical hazards are present. 1910.135(a)(2) states, “Protective helmets designed to reduce electrical shock hazard shall be worn by each such affected employee when near exposed electrical conductors which could contact the head.”

Although the OSHA standards themselves do not identify specific occupations or applications where head protection is required, Appendix B to Subpart I Part 9 lists some examples. It states “Some examples of occupations for which head protection should be routinely considered are: carpenters, electricians, lineman, mechanics and repairers, plumbers and pipe fitters, assemblers, packers, wrappers, sawyers, welders, laborers, freight handlers, timber cutting and logging, stock handlers, and warehouse laborers.” The appendix also provides examples of general applications where head protection should be worn.

In terms of what constitutes a “protective helmet,” 29 CFR 1910.135 makes a distinction between hard hats purchased prior to July 5, 1994, and hats purchased after that date. Helmets purchased after July 5, 1994, must comply with the performance guidelines in the ANSI Z89.1-1986, American National Standard for Personal Protection—Protective Headwear for Industrial Workers Requirements. Hats obtained before that date must comply with the 1969 version of the ANSI standard (ANSI Z89.1-1969).

ANSI Z89.1-1997

ANSI Z89.1-1997 separates protective helmets into different types and classes.

Impact Types

Type I

Helmets intended to reduce the force of impact resulting from a blow only to the top of the head.

Type 1 helmets incorporate a full brim (the brim fully encircles the dome of the hat)

Type II

Helmets intended to reduce the force of impact resulting from a blow which may be received off center or to the top of the head.

Type 2 helmets have no encircling brim, but may include a short bill on the front (similar to a baseball cap).

Electrical Classes

Class G (General)

Class G helmets are intended to reduce the danger of contact exposure to low voltage conductors. Test samples are proof-tested at 2200 volts (phase to ground). However, this voltage is not intended as an indication of the voltage at which the helmet protects the wearer.

Class E (Electrical)

Class E helmets are intended to reduce the danger of exposure to high voltage conductors. Test samples are proof-tested at 20,000 volts (phase to ground). However, this voltage is not intended as an indication of the voltage at which the helmet protects the wearer.

Class C (Conductive)

Class C helmets are not intended to provide protection against contact with electrical conductors.

ANSI Z89.1-2003

ANSI published a revision to the Z89.1-1997 standard in 2003. The most significant changes from the 1997 version were made to harmonize with other national standards that test and evaluate equipment performance. In addition, many physical requirements for helmet components that do not provide added user value or that limited design or performance have been removed.

Helmet Suspensions

8 point ratchet

Ratchet headgear provides over 30 adjustments for comfortable fit without removing headgear. One-piece nylon headband with nylon, crown straps, with two crown height adjustments, providing the ultimate degree in comfort and impact protection. Fits sizes 6 1/2 to 8 inch.

6 point ratchet

Ratchet headgear provides over 30 adjustments for comfortable fit without removing headgear. One-piece nylon headband with nylon, crown straps, with two crown height adjustments, providing an additional amount of impact protection. Fits sizes 6 1/2 to 8 inch.

4 point ratchet

Ratchet headgear provides over 30 adjustments for comfortable fit without removing headgear. STandard headgear with woven nylon straps. Fits sizes 6 1/2 to 8 inch.

4 point pin-lock

Standard headgear with woven nylong straps. Fits sizes 6 1/2 to 8 inch.

4 point plastic

Four-point molded plastic suspension system with cost effective protection. Fits sizes 6 1/2 to 8 inch.

Spill containment regulations

See our spill containment regulations resource page

Regulating, standard, and safety approval agencies

ANSI – American National Standards Institute

ATEX – Atmospheres Explosives (EU)

ATEX stands for Atmospheres Explosives and was introduced by the EEC to become effective by 1st July 2003. A British Standard, EN 13463-1:2001, covering non-electrical equipment for potentially explosive atmospheres was subsequently introduced in the UK to match it. It covers all equipment that operates either in mines (Group I) or in potentially explosive gas, vapour or air/dust mixtures (Group II). Category 1 covers equipment which has built-in principal means of protection, together with a back-up to cover at least two disturbances, while Category 2 has a means of protection to cope with frequently occurring disturbances.

See Ratings, standards, regulations: ATEX certification coding